Acknowledgments

The norm in the Research Division is for colleagues to provide extensive support to each other. Our team spirit is such that formal acknowledgment of routine contributions is not expected. In keeping with this practice, I want to acknowledge the extraordi­nary contributions that Patricia A, Lombard made to this report. Her normal contribution is to mediate efforts to extract meaning­ful data from computer data bases. Without her assistance, the tables in this report could not have been compiled. Her extraordi­nary efforts related to reviewing my organizational plan for making sense of a mountain of interview data. Her logical and inci­sive analysis helped provide a consistent conceptual structure for the report. Finally, her thoughtful and careful review of a lengthy draft—sandwiched between her responsibilities for implementing a new computer system for the division—contributed immensely to whatever coherence exists in the final draft. Any defects on that score, of course, are the responsibility of the author.
Once exceptions are made, it is difficult to draw a line. I would be remiss if I did not give full credit to Joe Cecil of the Research Division for having the foresight to sense the importance of toxic tort issues to the federal judiciary long before the June 1984 Asbes­tos Case Management Conference. He has been a vital catalyst to all of the division’s efforts in this area.
Finally, I want to thank Professor D. Marie Provine of Syracuse University for thoughtful comments on the settlement section and Professor Irwin A. Horowitz of the University of Toledo for contin­uous support and consultation as well as a review of the final draft.

The norm in the Research Division is for colleagues to provide extensive support to each other. Our team spirit is such that formal acknowledgment of routine contributions is not expected. In keeping with this practice, I want to acknowledge the extraordi­nary contributions that Patricia A, Lombard made to this report. Her normal contribution is to mediate efforts to extract meaning­ful data from computer data bases. Without her assistance, the tables in this report could not have been compiled. Her extraordi­nary efforts related to reviewing my organizational plan for making sense of a mountain of interview data. Her logical and inci­sive analysis helped provide a consistent conceptual structure for the report. Finally, her thoughtful and careful review of a lengthy draft—sandwiched between her responsibilities for implementing a new computer system for the division—contributed immensely to whatever coherence exists in the final draft. Any defects on that score, of course, are the responsibility of the author.
Once exceptions are made, it is difficult to draw a line. I would be remiss if I did not give full credit to Joe Cecil of the Research Division for having the foresight to sense the importance of toxic tort issues to the federal judiciary long before the June 1984 Asbes­tos Case Management Conference. He has been a vital catalyst to all of the division’s efforts in this area.
Finally, I want to thank Professor D. Marie Provine of Syracuse University for thoughtful comments on the settlement section and Professor Irwin A. Horowitz of the University of Toledo for contin­uous support and consultation as well as a review of the final draft.